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Frequently Asked Questions

  1. Who pays for attendance at articulation committee meetings?

  2. Who pays for the costs of hosting an articulation committee meeting?

  3. How can we arrange to have a System Liaison Person appointed to our committee?

  4. When is it appropriate to invite representatives from private post-secondary institutions to articulation committee meetings?

  5. Is it appropriate to ask attendees to leave for part of an articulation committee meeting?

  6. What happens to articulation committees that don't meet?

  7. Can an articulation committee that has been delisted be reactivated?

  8. What process should be followed when an institution changes its curriculum?

  9. Are we able to organize other activities in conjunction with the articulation committee meeting?

  10. An institution has not sent a representative to our committee's meetings for several years. How can we encourage them to attend?

  11. When do Ministry representatives attend articulation committee meetings?

  12. How do we avoid discussions going off track at our articulation committee meeting?

  13. My institution is hosting the meeting of my articulation committee this year. What is expected of us?

  14. As chair of my articulation committee, I have been asked to sit on a provincial committee. Is this part of my duties?

  15. What should be included in institutional reports for articulation committee meetings?

  16. What is Transfer Innovations (TI) funding, and how can my committee apply for it?

  17. Can I attend articulation meetings in other jurisdictions?

1. Who pays for attendance at articulation committee meetings?

Each institution is responsible for the costs associated with sending a representative from that institution. BCCAT does not cover costs associated with articulation committee meetings, apart from the attendance of BCCAT staff members.

2. Who pays for the costs of hosting an articulation committee meeting?

It is expected that the host institution will provide meeting space at no cost to the committee. Other costs associated with the meeting (e.g., catering, support staff time, photocopying) are the responsibility of the committee itself. See Cost of Hosting or Attending for more information.

3. How can we arrange to have a System Liaison Person appointed to our committee?

The articulation committee should ask its members to suggest the names of deans, associate deans, or other instructional administrators who might be suitable. The committee can recommend a candidate for SLP via a motion passed at a committee meeting. BCCAT will make the appointment, or can canvass the system for additional nominees if the committee cannot identify a suitable candidate. See Responsibilities of System Liaison Persons (SLPs) for more information.

4. When is it appropriate to invite representatives from private post-secondary institutions to articulation committee meetings?

Private institutions that are members of the BC Transfer System are required to send representatives to the meetings of appropriate articulation committees. These representatives are full voting members. Inviting individuals from other private institutions may be done at the discretion of the committee. See Responsibilities of Individual Committee Members for more information.

5. Is it appropriate to ask attendees to leave for part of an articulation committee meeting?

Part of BCCAT’s mandate is to facilitate cooperation among all post-secondary institutions and stakeholders, and part of an articulation committee’s mandate is to foster collegial relations among disciplinary colleagues. There is a clear conflict between those goals and the practice of asking any members, SLPs, or guests to leave an articulation committee meeting. For these reasons, members, SLPs or guests should not be asked to leave a meeting.

6. What happens to articulation committees that don't meet?

Articulation committees that have not met regularly, or that have not responded to BCCAT requests for minutes or other information, may be delisted, i.e., removed from the list of active articulation committees. See Appendix C: Delisting Inactive Articulation Committees for more information.

7. Can an articulation committee that has been delisted be reactivated?

To be reinstated, the committee must re-apply for approval, using the procedure for approval of new committees. See Appendix B: Process for Establishing a New Articulation Committee for more information.

8. What process should be followed when an institution changes its curriculum?

One of the primary purposes of articulation committees is to provide a forum for the discussion of curricular issues, especially as they relate to articulation. At articulation meetings, representatives from institutions should discuss upcoming course or program changes that may or will affect transfer. However, institutions planning such changes should consult with other institutions as soon as possible, either at the articulation meeting or through email or the TCS (Transfer Credit System).  See Changes to Curriculum in the How to Articulate handbook for more information.

9. Are we able to organize other activities in conjunction with the articulation committee meeting?

Many articulation committees organize professional development events in conjunction with their meetings, or schedule their meetings to coincide with a conference related to their discipline. However, it is important to distinguish between articulation committee business (see Terms of Reference for articulation committees) and other business, and to ensure that attendees are not charged any fees to attend the articulation committee meeting itself. See Planning an Articulation Committee Meeting for more information.

10. An institution has not sent a representative to our committee's meetings for several years. How can we encourage them to attend?

A phone call or an email from the committee chair to the appropriate department, school, or division chair/head can help to clarify why a representative is not attending, and provide encouragement to do so. If the chair perceives an ongoing problem, he/she can also request help from BCCAT.

11. When do ministry representatives attend articulation committee meetings?

Some committees deal with subject areas for which there are corresponding responsibilities within the ministries responsible for secondary and for post-secondary education. Representatives from the appropriate ministry may be important if there are changes in curriculum, programs, or provincial regulations that affect a committee’s subject area. If you are not sure whether to invite a ministry representative, or whom to invite, BCCAT will be glad to put you in touch with the appropriate person.

12. How do we avoid discussions going off track at our articulation committee meeting?

Discussions at articulation committee meetings should focus on matters that are relevant to the Terms of Reference for articulation committees. A brief discussion or orientation at the beginning of each meeting (especially when guests have been invited or when many attendees are new) can be helpful in reminding attendees of the scope of discussion. A detailed agenda for the meeting may also help in focusing discussion. See Setting Effective Agendas for more information.

13. My institution is hosting the meeting of my articulation committee this year. What is expected of us?

The institution is expected to provide meeting space at no charge. The committee is expected to arrange to cover any other costs associated with hosting the meeting; the host institution may cover some or all of these costs at its own discretion. See Hosting an Articulation Meeting for more information.

14. As chair of my articulation committee, I have been asked to sit on a provincial committee. Is this part of my duties?

Articulation committees may be asked from time to time to send representatives to other committees or task forces. While such involvement can be desirable and mutually beneficial for both the chair and the committee, it may also require considerable time and effort. This kind of activity is not considered part of the chair’s duties, and each request for such representation should be judged on its own merits.

15. What should be included in institutional reports for articulation committee meetings?

The range of subject matter presented in institutional reports varies. However, an institutional report should, at a minimum, identify the following:

  • Any institutional, departmental or program changes that are anticipated to have an effect on articulation and transfer (e.g., curriculum changes); and
  • Any items that may be of interest to the committee membership (e.g., new assessment tools, textbooks and other learning resources).

BCCAT highly recommends that articulation committee members submit an institutional report for circulation in advance of the meeting, or in the context of the meeting. The committee chair or meeting chair should indicate to the attendees when reports should be submitted to be distributed in advance of the meeting, and should circulate the reports to the committee members. A template for institutional reports is available on the BCCAT website. 

The range of subject matter presented in institutional reports varies. However, an institutional report should, at a minimum, indicate the following:

  • Any institutional, departmental or program changes that are anticipated to have an effect on articulation and transfer (e.g., curriculum changes); and
  • Any items that may be of interest to the committee membership (e.g., assessment tools, textbooks and other learning resources).
- See more at: http://bccat.ca/info/handbook/pages/13-what-should-be-included-institutional-reports-articulation-committee-meetings#sthash.D5lAThrR.dpuf

16. What is Transfer Innovations (TI) funding, and how can my committee apply for it?

Articulation committees may be asked from time to time to send representatives to other committees or task forces. While such involvement can be desirable and mutually beneficial for both the chair and the committee, it may also require considerable time and effort. This kind of activity is not considered part of the chair’s duties, and each request for such representation should be judged on its own merits.

Please see this Transfer Innovations (TI) Funding for more information.

17. Can I attend articulation committee meetings in other jurisdictions?

BCCAT encourages articulation chairs to attend meetings of the same discipline in other jurisdictions.